Analysis of shelley s ode to the

This shows the unique style of Shelley.

Analysis of shelley s ode to the

The West Wind acts as a driving force for change and rejuvenation in the human and natural world. Shelley views winter not just as last phase of vegetation but as the last phase of life in the individual, the imagination, civilization and religion.

Being set in Autumn, Shelley observes the changing of the weather and its effects on the internal and external environment. By examining this poem, the reader will see that Shelley can only reach his sublime by having the wind carry his "dead thoughts" 63 which through an apocalyptic destruction, will lead to a rejuvenation of the imagination, the individual and the natural world.

Shelley begins his poem by addressing the "Wild West Wind" 1. He quickly introduces the theme of death and compares the dead leaves to "ghosts" 3. The imagery of "Pestilence-stricken multitudes" makes the reader aware that Shelley is addressing more than a pile of leaves.

In the first line, Shelley use the phrase "winged seeds" which presents images of flying and freedom. The only problem is that they lay "cold and low" or unnourished or not elevated. He likens this with a feeling of being trapped.

The important word is "seeds" for it shows that even in death, new life will grow out of the "grave. Heavenly images are confirmed by his use of the word "azure" which besides meaning sky blue, also is defined, in Webster's Dictionary, as an "unclouded vault of heaven.

The word "Spring" besides being a literary metaphor for rebirth also means to rise up. In line 9, Shelley uses soft sounding phrases to communicate the blowing of the wind.

Analysis of shelley s ode to the

This tercet acts as an introduction and a foreshadow of what is to come later. Shelley goes on to talk of the wind as a "Destroyer and Preserver" which brings to mind religious overtones of different cultures such as Hinduism and Native Indian beliefs. The poem now sees a shift of the clouds which warns of an upcoming storm.

From the SparkNotes Blog

This helps Shelley begin to work towards a final climax. Again, the reader feels somewhat claustrophobic. The "closing night" feels as if it is surrounding the author as he writes and the reader as he or she reads. The "closing night" is used also to mean the final night.

Shelley shows how he cannot have a transcendence even in an open sky for even the sky is a "dome. But in following lines Shelley writes how this "sepulchre" will "burst" In that sense, "Vaulted" takes on the meaning of a great leap and even a spring.

Shelley uses the phrase "congregated might" not just to mean a collaborative effort, but to represent all types of religion. Shelley seems to use obtuse phrasing to frighten the reader and to show the long breath of the wind. Shelley wants the reader to visualize the "dome" as having a presence like a volcano.

And when the "dome" does "burst," it will act as a "Destroyer and Preserver" and creator.Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" is a good example of Shelley's poetic mind at work, and when it is at work, it is heaping up similes and metaphors. It is Shelley's extravagant fondness for metaphorical language that makes him all too often obscure and his subject matter thin.

A summary of “Ode to the West Wind” in Percy Bysshe Shelley's Shelley’s Poetry. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Shelley’s Poetry and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Analysis. The central thematic concerns of Shelley’s poetry are largely the same themes that defined Romanticism, especially among the younger English poets of Shelley’s era: beauty, the passions, nature, political liberty, creativity, and the sanctity of the imagination.

Analysis of Shelley's Ode To the West Wind In "Ode to the West Wind," Percy Bysshe Shelley tries to gain transcendence, for he shows that his 4/4(1).

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“Ode to the West Wind” is an ode, written by Percy Bysshe Shelley in near Florescent, Italy. It was originally published in by Edmund Ollier and Charles in London. It was originally published in by Edmund Ollier and Charles in London. A summary of “Ode to the West Wind” in Percy Bysshe Shelley's Shelley’s Poetry. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Shelley’s Poetry and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Read this English Essay and over 88, other research documents. Analysis of Shelley’s "ode to the West Wind". Analysis of Shelley's Ode To the West Wind In "Ode to the West Wind," Percy Bysshe Shelley tries to gain /5(1).

Percy Bysshe Shelley was born August 4, , at Field Place, near Horsham, Sussex, England. The eldest son of Timothy and Elizabeth Shelley, with one brother and four sisters, he stood in line to inherit not only his grandfather's considerable estate but also a seat in Parliament.

Analysis of shelley s ode to the

- The Ode to West Wind Percy Bysshe Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind" is a lyric poem. The poem addresses the west wind as the powerful force and the speaker asks the west wind to disseminate his words and thoughts throughout the world.

SparkNotes: Shelley’s Poetry: “Ode to the West Wind”